Review: Frog Legs Uni-Tine Front Fork for Manual Wheelchairs

I recently ordered a pair of Frog Legs “Uni-Tine” front forks for my Tilite TR. Turns out, for whatever reason, the Frog Legs Uni-Tine front forks were cheaper from SportAid.com than from the manufacturer Frog Legs. As you can see, the Uni-Tine forks are single sided, leaving the outside of each front wheel completely naked.

I’ve used and abused my current Tilite TR for the past 6 years, and never have I once had to remove the front forks. The Tilite TR has been so good to me, so there was never a reason to mess with the front forks. This past week I began attempting to remove the original factory front forks. I realized it would be extremely difficult. Years of abuse caused the front fork to stick to the stem bolt. After 1.5 hours of beating the original forks with a large hammer and heating with a blow torch, finally, I was ready to install the new Uni-Tine front forks.

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This is where I ran into another issue. It turns out the wheelchair’s front fork stem bolt is a bit too long to provide a perfect fit. Meaning, I placed the wheelchair fork stem bolt through the uni-tine fork, then tightened the bolt. There was still about 2-3 millimeters of play even after the nut was tightened to the end of the bolt thread. The result was 2 extremely loose front forks. I took a trip to Lowes and was able to find metric washers which helped remedy the 2-3 millimeters of play. Below you can see 2 washers above the front fork and the metric washer size.

 

When ordering the uni-tine front forks I also purchased 4″ Softroll front casters (aka wheels). The hub can either be composite or aluminum. I suggest the aluminum option, as it’s built sturdier and weighs less.

The Uni-Tine Frog Legs front fork has been good to me since making the switch over a week ago. Functionally, the front fork gets my vote. It’s sturdy when rolling over rocky uneven pavement, producing no rattle at all. Also, when speeds increase I don’t get “the wobbles”, which is priceless. Cosmetically, Uni-Tine forks are a plus as well. Granted, my opinion is subjective, but I think the look of these wheelchair forks are sweet. The outside of each caster (aka “front wheel”) is completely naked, leaving the entire side exposed, except for a small allen key bolt touching the bearing, holding the soft-roll securely in place. Wheelchair logistical clearance will be increased slightly, due to the outside of each caster being naked. As for cost, you’ll spend under $100 for a pair of Uni-Tine forks, which in my opinion is fair. When ordering, there’ll be an option to “add casters”. I suggest getting the 4″ soft-roll casters. Only downside I’ve seen so far would be the issue I had while installing. I think whoever sells Uni-Tine wheelchair forks should consider shipping the product with washers designed to fit the specific wheelchair model’s stem bolt. That way, if/when there’s an issue it can be remedied easy by the consumer.

All in all, Frog Legs Inc did a great job manufacturing the Uni-Tine wheelchair fork. It’s an inexpensive, sleek upgrade to almost any stock lightweight wheelchair fork/caster combination. Therefore, Frog Legs Uni-Tine wheelchair forks get the HowiRoll stamp of approval!

Please feel free to contact me at jacob@HowiRoll.com if you have any questions about the Uni-Tine fork by Frog Legs.

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